Anticipatory Innovation with Jose Ramos

Organizing alternatives for social and ecological justice with Jacques Boulet

Philosophies of the Good Society with Cristina Neesham

Recreating our organisations with Tricia Hiley

Kanyini with Robert Hoskins

Legitimate knowledge: the struggle for science with  Tricia Hiley

Community Development with Jacques Boulet

Body, psyche, soul, spirit: Towards an Integral Psychology with Chris Lloyd

Synapse: Creating Connections and Bridging spaces between Knowledges with  Jenni Goricanec and Eleni Rivers

Innovating to Sustain with Jenni Goricanec

Media Time Consciousness: Community Media Production with Jose Ramos

Listening to Indiginous Voices with Robert Hoskins

Framing the Self with Kristin Diemer

Movement, Ritual and Society with Julia Catton

Co-evolving Spirituality for Life with Caresse Cranwell and Peter Cock

Deepening Ecological Citizenship with Peter Cock and Sean O’Sullivan

Human Fulfilment: Philosophical Explorations with Cristina Neesham

Myth Mapping with Eleni Rivers and Robert Hoskin

Voice, Body, Mind with Louise Mahler

Revitalizing Words and Language with Joan Sheridan, Tricia Hiley and Jacques Boulet

Ecoliteracy with Wendy Hopkins

Anticipatory Innovation

The premise of the unit is that past innovation processes, by being carried out in isolation from or without sufficient sensitivity to their wider social and environmental contexts have lead to a state of global un-sustainability. That is, through these limited innovation processes, we have created a situation where the systems that are necessary to support the continuation of our culture of innovation are themselves in decline. A further premise is that by coming to terms with how past innovation processes have been limited or partial, pathways become available for creating better innovation processes that might address past problems and avoid similar problems in the future. The idea that all innovations, whether technological or social in nature, are created through social processes will be an important tenet of the unit. The relationship between technological, social and cultural development will be explored. Attention will be focused on the way that social structures shape innovations, and on how social structures might be shaped towards implementation of anticipatory innovation.

The theoretical basis of the class rests upon systems thinking and social constructivist theory as means for examining the problems related to past innovations and avoiding such problems with future innovations. Strategic Foresight methodologies will be introduced as means for both creating innovative options and “wind tunnel” testing specific proposals. The principles of Participatory Action Research also play a central role in the anticipatory innovation process.

Integration in this class is seen in terms of developing a deepened appreciation of the role of individual subjectivity and collective intersubjectivity in the development of innovative social structures and technologies that can lead to sustainable futures with less likelihood of contributing to future problems.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Jose Ramos

Organizing alternatives for social and ecological justice

In this unit we explore possibilities for rethinking the nature of ‘organization’ in respect to both organizing as an activity and process, as well as an entity, form and structure of permanence. The unit aims to challenge in particular our assumptions as they relate to organizations, examining what might be considered ‘alternative’ (in either form or function) to current norms of organizations, as well as challenge our assumptions about how organising can happen.

Whilst in the unit we are interested in exploring the history of becoming (ontogeny) of various organizations, believing that their social, cultural and practical contexts inform any discussion of organization, we always bring our discussion back to our ‘experienced’ present, how the concept of ‘organizing’ connects with the needs, hopes and possibilities of communities today. Our understanding of ‘organization’, built up over history, is the undercurrent of all conversations in the unit, leading us to a place of greater understanding of our own current situation and the needs that this creates for us in the future we are creating by our ‘present’.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Jacques Boulet

Philosophies of the Good Society

In this unit we explore the fundamental principles of the good society through three dominant paradigms of philosophical thought about social progress: the scientific-technological paradigm, the economic paradigm, and the political paradigm. The unit explores the co-ordinates of humanism and anti-reductionism in creating a ‘good society’ based on eudaimonic principles, which postulate that the role of society is to facilitate (rather than obstruct) human fulfilment. We then examine and debate the crucial question of whether such a society is possible, and if so, in what conditions.

The body of knowledge informing this unit includes perspectives on the good society ranging from 18th c. Enlightenment (Adam Smith) and 19th c. political philosophy (J. S. Mill and Karl Marx) to modern and contemporary developments of holistic social projects (Hayek, Ellul, Lippman, Rawls, Hamilton). The conversation is open to a plurality of epistemological perspectives, developed in a symbiotic process of mutually beneficial relating and learning between facilitator and participants.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Christina Neesham

Recreating our organisations

We live in a world of organisations, each with its own culture and processes and each creating its own set of experiences for those who interact with it. Whilst we cannot escape from the reality of organisations in our lives, we can learn to better understand, work with and change (for the better) the organisations in which we play a part. We do not have to leave our organisations to create change – we can choose to stay and work for change from within. This unit works particularly at the level of practical theories, concepts, models and skills for people to do just this.

During the unit participants will be introduced to a wide range of organizational theories, concepts, models and skills with the intention that they become both more knowledgeable and more competent in addressing organizational issues by both participating in and leading initiatives creating organisations in which they wish to work.

Literature and theory in this area is substantial. We will be particularly focusing on works in the areas of learning organisations, systems theory,socio-technical systems, organisational change, etc. Some of the literature will include Images of Organization (Morgan 1986), Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change (Bridges 1995), Creating Workforce Innovation: Turning Individual Creativity into Organisational Innovation (Morgan 1993), Dialogue: the transforming power of conversation (Ellinor and Gerard 1998), Rethinking the Fifth Discipline (Flood 1999), The Heart of the Enterprise (Beer 1995) and Communities of Practice (Wenger 1998) amongst many others.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Tricia Hiley

Kanyini Intensive

7 day intensive (Sunday to Sunday, plus travel time) retreat located within the Uluru National Park and surrounds in the Northern Territory.

This is a unique opportunity to receive teachings from Bob Randall on the principles of Kanyini and Aboriginal culture. This will be a profound experience towards integrity in cultural counter-flows, a re-alignment of the importance of personal spirituality, and towards acknowledgment of 70,000 years of Aboriginal knowledge and traditions. Uncle Bob will share his wisdom and belief that spirituality is the ultimate answer to reconciliation in Australia. Uncle Bob will share his wisdom on aspects of Kanyini including, connections with the dreaming, place, family relationships and the spirit. Teaching Kanyini and sharing Aboriginal culture, knowledge and spirituality with all Australians and beyond, are an integral part of Bob's vision.

This is manifested by Dorothea, Bob’s daughter who leads the group out with the elders & other members of the family onto the homelands. The group then spends time out bush, learning from the elders their ways of being on the land. This is a rare privilege for the group attending and generous opportunity to share their stories.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Robert Hoskins

Legitimate knowledge: the struggle for science

Twenty years ago the great Deakin Uni. sociologist Max Charlesworth and colleagues wrote a book about Gus Nossal's Walter & Eliza Hall Institute of medical research. They sketched a comprehensive picture of the nitty gritty reality of the making of "legitimate knowledge". However, sadly, few scientists, few even of WEHI's own scientists would have read the book let alone reckoned that it might be worth reading, someday. And that, in a sense, is the greatest problem the scientific project has: a failure to understand its own nature even among its own practitioners. It means that the nexus between science and politics is not understood and that since the failure extends to scientists themselves, they "oversell" their science and thereby demean it - profoundly. ANU sociologist Eva Etzioni-Halevy wrote an excellent, if much unrecognised, piece on just this ... 25 years ago!

This course examines the nature of science as a human (social) project. It aims to make science stronger and more legitimate through the respect that understanding its nature as the most rigorous internally coherent body of knowledge yet developed, can give.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Tricia Hiley

Community Development

Community Development has variously been condemned to oblivion as naïve romanticism or reduced to an ill-understood panacea, especially for the ‘disadvantaged’ and then, in turn, criticised as a ‘cheap’ pseudo-solution for problems which have their roots far beyond the local community. This unit offers a reflective and constructive space where we can re-construct community in its ontological, epistemological and ‘praxis’ dimensions. We explore concepts, strategies and practices associated with Community Development (with strategies and practices understood here as a means of mediating between theoretical / empirical / ideological aspects of ‘community’ and the practical / technical / methodical aspects of community ‘intervention’, whether referred to as community ‘development’, ‘organisation’, ‘building’ or ‘strengthening’ etc). Basing our exploration of community development in the dialectical theory-practice (or reflection-action) relationship which gives it real meaning, we move beyond the words and make the actors explicit. We pay careful consideration to the ideological and theoretical premises which ex/implicitly underwrite our actions.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Jacques Boulet

Body, psyche, soul, spirit

This unit engages with a view of humans as relational and interconnected beings. To use Hillman’s term this unit is about re visioning and re imagining the multifaceted, richly textured “depths” of soul, “heights” of spirit and “surfaces” of body and mind that constitute being human. More than “vision” it is also about humans as embodied beings whose bodily experiences are a central source of implicit/tacit knowing and connection to others and to the non human world. It presents challenges and alternatives to the splits between body and psyche/soul, matter and mind/spirit, reason and emotion, imagination and objective and unitive, inner and outer, self and other, conscious and unconscious, experience and behaviour, the natural and the cultural that have traditionally plagued those disciplines such as Psychology and Sociology that have attempted to understand what it is to be fully human.

A cacophony of different languages/languagings and voices are needed to engage with these different facets of being human: the conceptual languages of science and reason as well as the mythopoetic languages of stories, metaphors, and imagination, and the experiential/sensing languages of the body. The potentially progressive/transformative, as well as regressive possibilities, in the development of humans will be explored. The boundaries between “self” and others and how this boundary is woven and rewoven, and the emergent properties and possibilities of inter subjectivity and dialogue will be of particular interest.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Chris Lloyd

Synapse: Creating Connections and bridging spaces between Knowledges

An aesthetic experience is the spark of enlightenment or connection in an 'Aha’ moment when things make sense and everything becomes clear! Such a moment has been described by James Joyce as 'aesthetic arrest'. Joseph Campbell helped to make the idea known, in his lectures on Joyce: “The aesthetic experience is a simple beholding of the object....you experience a radiance. You are held in aesthetic arrest.... The mind is arrested and raised above desire and loathing.”(James Joyce, ‘Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man’).

This program will move participants to create their own bridges between many and varied ways of knowing, crossing disciplinary divides between art, science and spirituality/religion. Through a series of visual explorations and using a variety of materials, participants will become familiar with a holistic approach to aesthetics by way of drawing, painting, experimentation with prisms and map making. Entering into the aesthetic experience opens up creativity which will be brought into physical form through individual and group projects. Shared portals create cultural connections across discipline, language and culture.

Facilitators

Jacques Boulet

Innovating to Sustain

Innovating to sustain has been developed to: “educate the total person for survival in an unpredictable, turbulent future; where facts, concepts, theories, intellectual skills, and well developed cognitive maps are not enough” (Davies, 1993) This unit is based on two fundamental assumptions:

1. The unit is designed as a series of questions, a logic of inquiry, to prompt participants’ own self-directed learning, through which they are able to extract the information they need from their environment (Emery, 1993). In this way learners are encouraged to develop their own strategies, and to seek expert knowledge on a highly situated, “as needed” basis, as part of the process of investigation established by the logic of inquiry. The basic assumption behind this unit is that the appropriate way to learn how to survive and thrive in today’s world is through such self-directed investigation, not revelation.

2. This subject aims to provide an environment where the psychological requirements for productive work are both produced and sustained. According to Emery, there are six psychological requirements for productive, satisfying work:

  • The opportunity to envisage, and work towards, a desirable and feasible future (essential where suicide rates are accelerating);
  • A sense of one’s own work meaningfully contributing to society; the chance to feel useful and valued;
  • Working conditions in which one can get help and respect from others;
  • Optimal opportunities to learn, and to go on learning;
  • Optimal elbow room: a sense of being one’s own boss, but of there being enough support to enable one to know what to do next;
  • An optimal level of variety.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Jenni Goricanec

Media, Time, Consciousness: Community Media Production

In order for us to address the complex challenges of the 21st century, we must first learn how the challenges we face are framed and rendered by the media, the consciousness such media speaks to, or is spoken by, and understand how communication processes are complicit in the problems we face. From here we can begin to re-frame, re-image and reconceptualise these challenges, and develop new ways of addressing these challenges through media production and communication.

The theoretical basis of this unit rests upon the notion of ‘temporal conscientisation’, referring to our capacity to empower ourselves through a re-contextualising of our place in time. As we learn more about our histories, how our world has come to be the way it is (and the stories that offer these explanations), and as we learn about our futures, (including the various challenges we are facing as people and as a planet in the 21st century and beyond) this new expanded context has the capacity to transform our actions in the present. In a sense this means opening our hearts and minds to past and future generations to expand the context of the present moment, as a opportunity for new action. In this unit you will be continuing to develop a theory-practice dialectic through undertaking a media production project.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Jose Ramos

Listening to Indigenous Voices

In the unit you will have the opportunity to begin or continue your own process of relating to Aboriginal peoples and their struggles for justice in contemporary Australia. We believe it is vital for today’s leaders to listen to contemporary Indigenous concerns as they relate to one’s relationship to land, community and responsible living. The principal idea of this unit is to sharpen your awareness of contemporary Aboriginal issues and the rewriting of Australian history. This unit give you opportunities to listen to Aboriginal voices, through conversations, presentations, research, literature, films and the Aboriginal art movement. You will be encouraged to relate your learning in this unit to other units in this course, leading to integration and transformation. It will be essential to present a balanced review of Indigenous issues and concerns to hold together the “hard truths” and hopeful signs and developments.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Robert Hoskins

Framing the Self

Integrative and transformative practice begins with awareness of the reflexive nature of the development of the individual within In this unit we explore the social construction of self and identity. Participants will be invited to develop greater awareness of the aspects around us influencing our identity and, reflexively how identity and perception of self can shape our understanding of the world around us. Prominent sociological models of self and identity construction will be examined in conjunction with photographic visual expressions of identity.

Photography has been chosen as a mode of expression and exploration as the camera is omnipresent in contemporary society and photographic images, controlled by the photographer, are representations of events or persons and influenced by what the photographer wants us to see.

The photographer, intentionally or not, introduces aspects of his or her own identity culture, views and values influencing the image. Those who view the image also bring their own knowledge, experience and beliefs thereby influencing their perception of the image.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Kristin Diemer

Movement, Ritual and Society

Rituals and habitual patterns are very important. This statement applies to movement patterns as much as speech patterns. Teachers, group leaders, ministers of religion can benefit from being able to recognize the difference between ritual or habitual, traditional or customary, patterns of movement, and by being alert to the possible impact on behaviour of a change in these patterns.

In fact the consideration and understanding of patterns of movement is important for anyone planning to lead a group, or when planning any kind of group intervention. When exploring this subject as a student you can refer to the discipline of Social Psychology and to works within the field of Ethnographic Enquiry. In addition there is much to be learnt by observation and careful analysis. You can ask, what are the various motives behind a particular ritual movement? Or question, what is the benefit of a habitual pattern of action for an individual? Or, one can explore the ethical impact on a group of people of a change in their traditional ways of interacting?

Verbal patterns are studied carefully from the time we learn to read at school. But patterns of movement, used all the time in social interactions, are often adopted without us realizing that we are responding with great significance to a pattern initiated by another.

When we learn a habitual or ritual movement, or make changes to it, it adds to the pattern's importance. Changes to it are important because any change made to a pattern of movement can be seen as unexpected, creative or subversive. Some may want to hold onto a traditional pattern of action with a belligerent intensity. But usually having an action model, soundly based on present needs, is what is needed. Plus, if a change of behaviour involves an easily recognizable movement pattern, it can ease the adoption of other aspects of change.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Julia Catton

Co-evolving Spirituality for Life

In this unit we explore our beliefs within the context of our personal and cultural developmental stories. We situate ourselves within an evolutionary cosmology and within the developmental history of consciousness. We own the rise of our human species’ power and a decline in the significance of ideas of God or Gods. We will explore the question of what an engaged spirituality of today looks like? Where are our evolutionary edges? How are we invited to participate more fully in the unfolding mystery of existence? How does this engagement shape our societal, ascetic and ecological world views and actions?

Central to human life is the desire to plumb the depths of the mystery of our existence and live according to what is true, good and beautiful. And yet, in this post-modern world all truths are partial. Truth seeking is a process of unfoldment wherein what was true in one period may be seen to be only partially true in another. The test of truth is how validly it orients us to creatively participate in the evolving world in each era. Spiritual knowing is formed within each one of us by the means we engage truth seeking, the structure of belief that we bring to each encounter with mystery and our ability to engage in the co-revelatory process.

Facilitators

Caresse Cranwell and Peter Cock

Deepening Ecological Citizenship

This unit explores processes for deepening our partnership with Gaia. The intention is to deepen consciousness and actions for becoming a life-serving member of our species. What kind of societies and lifestyles fit with such aspirations? What are our rights and responsibilities as earth citizens and what does being a member of communities mean? We examine the role of spirituality in ecological citizenship and conclude with an exploration of the politics and ascetics of action.

This unit is premised on participants owning their membership of the earth’s ecology and recognizing the power of the earth to reshape us. We will brainstorm creative ideas; use role-play; confront the contradictions of these experiments. We will actively and compassionately work with the gaps between our intentions and practice and explore the role of emotions such as hope, fear, despair and guilt in shaping motivations. We will think, feel and act together to examine connections between partnership with the earth, with each other and our own inner work. This will deepen possibilities for ecological citizenship and contribute to the regeneration of hope and facilitate transformative action.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Peter Cock and Sean O’Sullivan

Philosophies of Human Fulfilment

This unit explores and evaluates some of the most influential conceptions of human fulfilment in modern culture, with a view to debating value priorities and constructing (trans)personal perspectives on what constitutes human fulfilment.

Topics discussed include: Aristotle’s conception of the good life (eudaimonia); reason, knowledge and technology; wealth, liberty and virtue; leisure time and self-creation; spiritual approaches to human fulfilment; theories of value and humanist perspectives; theories of human need; the role of personal values in contemporary society and the Australian debate; the impact of personal values choices on contemporary society; personal values theory.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Cristina Neesham and David Buller

Myth Mapping

In this unit we explore several major myths that have influenced our Western consciousness as a way understand to what it means to be ‘Australian’ in the 21st Century. One of the key objectives of the unit will be to identify the myths operating in our own lives and to creatively engage with them. Myth mapping will involve us in several of the following ways:

  • start by walking the labyrinth, exploring its relationship with the journey of our lives
  • research stories and myths from various cultures and traditions using insights from Carl Jung, Marion Woodman and Joseph Campbell and other writers on archetypal psychology
  • briefly analyse contemporary Australian mythmaking and its rich history to identify some of the layers contributing to our identity as Australians, e.g. Indigenous, pioneer and recent immigrants
  • focus on issues of our relationship with land, Spirit and what it means to relate to those of different cultures
  • consider the clash of mythological realities that have occurred as a result of this experience and the inevitable conflict between Western aesthetics and its mythological structure and indigenous values and beliefs
  • consider mythological archetypes manifest in popular culture
  • relate what we have found to our own experience through reflection and creative processes.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Eleni Rivers and Robert Hoskin

Voice, Body, Mind

This unit is about coherence in communication. Its focus is voice and our ability to effectively use it in our relations with others around us.

Many of us are hindered by the psychic-vocal-prison of our culture, and further restricted by the solitary-vocal-confinement of our organizational and social contexts, in which vocal discovery is antithetical to dominant visual, patriarchal and linear thinking. This reinforces poor habitual patterns and works against coherence. The emergence of coherence in communication entails the consideration of voice holistically. The work of this unit is in evoking the fullness of voice, mediating between the singer/speaker’s intention and the listener’s receptivity in one integrated, coherent interaction, healing broken connections between mind, body and voice and experiencing them through the whole spectrum of sensual awareness.

Voice is considered a complex holistic phenomenon, a product (i.e. sound) which is invisible, made from a place in the body we can not see (larynx) or sometimes feel, linked to both emotional and physical responses, and with an output we hear differently to those around us. The exploration will thus include translation and interpretation, with singing playing a lead role in the exploration as it takes centre stage, asserting its role as an innate phylogenetic predisposition of all people; a tonality, lens and touch through which all life is comprehended.

Through a review of current vocal professions and vocal research, we discover a ‘broken’ tradition, holding the essence of voice but hindered by the social assumptions of Bel Canto, by the deeply entrenched divisions between vocal professions, by an ignorance of singing within those professions, by stifling positivist research and by conflicting ethical foundations.

Using an integrated approach incorporating heuristics and hermeneutics, the work of the unit involves a growing awareness of voice as a truly complex phenomenon. As we consider the ‘brokenness’ of our vocal tradition, the complex and bewildering role of emotions in vocal development and the impact of relational imbalances between self and other that lead to a lack of coherence of communication, our work becomes the task of reconstruction of the coherent self, integrating experiential techniques from disparate vocal professions and beyond, piecing together some critical components and creating others. What emerges is a new, integrative and transformative vocal practice.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Louise Mahler

Revitalizing Words and Language

This unit gives you the opportunity to liven up your language, through writing and speaking, exploring ways of expressing the living, dynamic nature of integrative and transformative practice and experiencing the reverberation of meaning of which Bachelard speaks, with the outcome being “texts that are vital”. (Richardson)

We will commence this course by considering the ontological functions of language. We will examine the ancient system of rhetoric and how it is used to form the classic paradigms of our contemporary society. Using contemporary texts the persuasive power of rhetoric and its argumentative force will be demonstrated. We will then consider how our world has been invented with language, paying special attention to historical and contemporary social, political and psychological discourse. Words, especially in their normal usages, support and sustain the text as it is currently written (including the underlying cultural subtext).

In this unit we will also look at the origins of words and how their meanings have ‘slipped’, as well as words we have transplanted from one context to another, sometimes with catastrophic consequences. Further, we explore those times when we seem to have no language with which to describe a phenomenon, an experience or an insight. We will explore these times and spaces as epistemological silences and consider both the epistemology which makes this so and the possibilities for understanding those silences and ‘re-languaging’ them, finding words and ways to express oneself in these times. Writing traditionally ‘fixes thought on paper’, externalizing what is internal. We will explore writing as method, with ‘methodology’ inextricable from ‘experience’ and vice versa, so closely woven as to be indistinguishable. In assignments, you will be asked to reconnect with the auditory nature of words, letting your ‘self’ linger a little, wandering with the words, feeling their flow, fullness and fragility.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Joan Sheridan, Tricia Hiley and Jacques Boulet

Ecoliteracy

In this unit we'll consciously inhabit and explore the Ecological...the patterns, relationships and interconnectedness of ecology; our collective home. We'll do this through observation, understanding and experiential immersion, using our whole-body intelligences, eg intellectual, emotional, sensory, kinesthetic. By focusing on a specific aspect of an Ecosystem, by regularly visiting a place of your choice, and through workshops that'll bring out our collective wisdom...we'll discover and uncover our own eco-literacy...then explore how we'll live and act from this new place of knowing.

Wendy Hopkins will draw on her explorations and experiences in ecoliteracy, group facilitation, social ecology, deep ecology, science and wonder (and of course, being a human immersed in and part of nature!). And together we'll draw on the experiences and wisdom of all participants, and the 'natural world' around us.

This subject represents one of the six electives required for the Graduate Masters, or one of the four required for the Graduate Diploma in the Integrative and Transformative Studies program.

Facilitators

Wendy Hopkins